Category: <span>Blog</span>

Recipe of the Month: Curry!

Garbanzo-Vegetable Green Curry

This dish has both spice and a hint of creamy sweetness from the coconut milk to satisfy all tastes. Green curry does have “kick” though, so if spice is not your style, substitute with the milder red or yellow curry. This recipe makes a great main dish served with a salad or can be a unique pairing to an Asian fish or poultry main course. If you have a nut allergy, the cashews are optional, but they do add crunch and a healthy fat to the dish so be sure to complement the curry with another healthy fat of your choosing (pumpkins seeds, sunflower seeds, or raw bean sprouts sprinkled on top).

Ingredients

  • 3 cups frozen cauliflower
  • 2 cans (15 ounces each) garbanzo beans or chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • 1 can (13.66 ounces) coconut milk
  • 1/4 cup green curry paste
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon cold water
  • 1-1/2 cups frozen peas
  • 2 packages (8.8 ounces each) ready-to-serve long grain rice
  • 1/2 cup lightly salted cashews (optional)

Directions

  1. In a large skillet, combine cauliflower, beans, coconut milk, curry paste and salt. Bring to a boil; cook, uncovered, 5-6 minutes or until cauliflower is tender.
  2. Combine cornstarch and water until smooth; gradually stir into the skillet. Stir in peas. Bring to a boil. Cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened.
  3. Meanwhile, prepare rice according to package directions. Sprinkle cauliflower mixture with cashews. Serve with rice.

References

Recipe of the Month!

Garlic Roasted Radishes

What is the secret to this recipe? Bring out the sweetness, and maximize the health benefits of radishes, by roasting this jewel-hued veggie in garlic. Roasting draws out a mildly sweet juice that tempers the peppery flavor of rashishes. The garlic and butter (or ghee, if you prefer) blend perfectly with this hidden sweetness, giving the roasted radish a delectable aroma and flavor. Enjoy these over salads, served as a side dish to a roasted or grilled main course, or as a snack.

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. radishes, ends trimmed and halved
  • 1 Tbsp. melted ghee or butter (vegan option: use coconut oil or avocado oil)
  • 1/2 tsp. sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp. pepper
  • 2–3 garlic cloves, finely minced
  • 1/4 tsp. dried parsley, dried chives or dried dill

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.
  2. In a bowl, combine the radishes, melted ghee or butter, salt and pepper and toss until radishes are evenly coated. Save adding the minced garlic until just before the radishes are done roasting.
  3. Spread radishes out in a large 9×13 inch baking dish. Don’t over crowd.
  4. Bake for 20-25 minutes, tossing every 10 or so minutes.
  5. Add the minced garlic and dried parsley and bake for an additional 5 minutes or until radishes are golden brown and cooked through.

Optional: Serve with a side of ranch dressing for dipping or drizzle on top and garnish with parsley, dill or chives.

References

 

Featured food: Radish!

Radishes

With its peppery, almost spicy flavor, radishes may not be one of the most popular garden vegetables, but they are one of the most nutritious. And they make a striking addition to salads and side dishes. For centuries, radishes have been used in Ayurvedic Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine to treat fever, sore throat, bile disorders, inflammation, and bacterial and fungal conditions.

Radishes are an excellent source of immunity-boosting Vitamin C. Other plant chemicals in rashies act as antioxidants, which are known for reducing risk for cancer, heart disease, and other chronic illnesses. Several phytochemicals in radishes contain antibacterial and antifungal properties. One antifungal protein is RsAFP2. In research, RsAFP2 caused cell death in Candida albicans, a common fungus normally found in humans, which, when overgrown may cause vaginal yeast infections, oral yeast infections (thrush), and invasive candidiasis.

Radishes are root vegetables from the Brassica family. Close relatives of the radish include broccoli, kale, cauliflower, and turnips to name a few. Radish bulbs, also called globes, come in many shapes and colors. The most popular variety in the United States resembles an amethyst colored golf ball with a small tail. Other varieties are white, purple, or black. They may be larger and oblong in shape. Lighter-colored varieties, including the winter daikon radish, have a milder taste. Radishes become overly pungent if they are left in the ground too long or not eaten right away. For the best flavor and texture, select smaller globes.

There are many ways to enjoy radishes and boost the nutrient power of your meals and snacks:

  • Add thin radish slices to sandwiches
  • Add grated radishes to coleslaw
  • Add zest and crunch to tuna salad by adding 1 to 2 teaspoons of chopped radishes
  • Top your steak, burger, or veggie burger with grilled radish slices
  • Use radishes as a healthy crudité for dips
  • Roast or grill radishes with garlic, herbs, olive oil or other healthy fat

References

 

Reading – It’s Good for Your Health!

When is the last time you have picked up a book?

We all are familiar with the cozy feeling of being curled up with a good book – be it a thrilling novel or a vicarious adventure through ancient history told with just enough spice to make you forget you’re reading about true events. What you may not know is that reading is more than an escape; it’s also good for your health.

Research shows that reading can:

  • reduce stress and symptoms of depression
  • aid in getting a good night’s sleep
  • enhance neural connections (builds vocabulary, expands worldviews, etc)
  • help prevent cognitive decline and possibly lengthen lifespan

Reading can even be a form of therapy known as bibliotherapy, which can help facilitate transitions in a person’s life and promote well-being. In clinical settings, mental health practitioners have used bibliotherapy to bring about insight for people struggling with emotional-behavioral problems. For people going through significant life changes, bibliotherapy can promote emotional healing.

You can reap the benefits of reading for health simply by choosing a book that truly interests you. It does not have to be a particular genre, length, or meet any other requirements. Be aware that print and digital forms of reading have different benefits and challenges, so choose a form that works best for your situation.

For our health and eco-conscious readers who want to realize the benefits of reading, we offer these titles on sustainable food systems for your reading pleasure:

Nourished Planet: Sustainability in the Global Food System by the Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition

Diet for a Hot Planet: The Climate Crisis at the End of Your Fork and What You Can Do about It by Anna Lappe

Rebuilding the Foodshed: How to Create Local, Sustainable, and Secure Food Systems by Philip Ackerman-Leist

Eating on the Wild Side by Jo Robinson

An Everlasting Meal: Cooking with Economy and Grace by Tamar Adler

References

Green Peas: Sweet, Sustainable & So Healthy

Who doesn’t love peas?

We often think of green peas as a last-minute addition to stews, rice dishes, and warm salads. So, you may be surprised to hear that the green pea is one of the most sustainable food crops offering many health benefits. This member of the legume family contains essential vitamins and antioxidants, including vitamin K, vitamin C, and folate. It is also rich in fiber, particularly the varieties that have edible pea pods, such as snow pea, sugar snap pea, and garden peas.

The fiber in peas supports digestive health by adding bulk to the stool and promoting regular bowel movements. The tiny pea is also a good source of iron, which is vital to the oxygen-carrying red blood cells. The antioxidant vitamins in peas help support immunity and protect the body’s cells from free radical damage.

As far as the environment is concerned, peas are good for Mother Earth. They are grouped with other vegetables known as “nitrogen fixers.” This means they take inert gases from the environment and convert them to useful ammonium, which nourishes the soil. In the right quantities relative to garden or crop size, peas, along with lentils and peanuts, can significantly reduce the need for fossil fuel fertilizers.

While we always advocate for organic, fresh produce, don’t overlook frozen peas; they retain their texture and nutrient content better than canned peas and can still be bought organic even if frozen. Overall, for adding color, mildly sweet flavor, and high quality nutrients to any meal, you can’t go wrong with green peas.

More shopping and cooking tips for green peas.

References